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Merry "Takemas"

December 27th, 2011 at 07:18 am

As I'm catching up on some blogs, I was reading CB in the City and how one felt when the other gifts were grander and more expensive.

In this morning's paper, reporters talked to those who were out and about yesterday and so many said how they were out buying things they didn't get for Christmas and wanted.

I'm not going to get real preachy here or anything, but somehow Christmas has become a one uppance on gifts and if you don't get what you want, then by golly, go get it!

It's kind of sad when we measure the pleasure of Christmas by the gifts we receive.

When I was growing up, my mom would buy things on sale and wrap them up. She liked seeing lots of gifts under the tree. I understand her reasoning, but as a 16 year old, receiving Pepto-Bismol and an Oil of Olay knock off wasn't exactly very thrilling. Especially when a friend would call and go over her list of things her parents gave her...I figure it must have been hundreds and hundreds of dollars. And, as a teenager, it was difficult to listen to her go on and on and be excited for her.

I admit my husband is very generous. He always has been and remains today. But, I don't sit there and look at the stuff and say, "gee, why didn't you get me this?" I am pleased he thought enough to buy me what he bought me.

When I was little my grandmother didn't have a lot of money. I knew she bought me something like a toy or outfit, but then she would give me some fudge and peanut brittle -- they were always good. So good, that's how she made money -- by making it and selling it during the holidays. I know I didn't get to eat a lot of it, but I remember receiving them. Interesting enough, I don't remember the other Christmas gifts she gave me.

Don't think I'm criticizing the bargain hunting of the day or days after Christmas. I was out in the frenzy for a bit buying cards and wrapping paper for next year.

But, I'm just commenting that society has made Christmas a time for taking overall. Perhaps Ebenezer (the unchanged one) and I can have coffee and discuss it.

7 Responses to “Merry "Takemas"”

  1. apnep Says:

    Christmas is what you make of it. If you subscribe to the idea that you are trying to "one-up" your neighbor, then that's what it is. Or you can subscribe to the idea that you are not going to let it be about what business marketers want which is spending and commercialism, but about Jesus Christ and pass that on to your children. There is nothing wrong with giving, but you have to do it in the right frame of mind and it does not have to be an overabundance of crap but truly items that MEAN something to someone. It doesn't have to be about materialism, it can also be about time and talents. Celebrate the season for what it is, the preparation and waiting of the birth of a Savior, not commercialism and just don't pay attention to what others do. You'll be much happier.

  2. MonkeyMama Says:

    I think a lot of it is just the material sprirt of Christmas in general. I personally went shopping yesterday but it was not at all in the vein of "Why didn't they get me this?" It was more, "In-laws badgered my for a wish list and I got all this Christmas money - might as well buy some of the stuff I wanted and didn't get." Though without the very material celebration with the in-laws, I don't think I would have realized I wanted this stuff, nor thought to have gone shopping. I've been particularly noticing this year since I barely went into a store all year, and I realized the more I went into stores at year-end the more I tended to want to spend. IT was kind of obvious after a year of little urge to spend.

    OF course, growing up, Christmas was never about the gifts, for me.

    My dh on the other hand? I told him I was buying a couple of things, and asked if there was anything he didn't get? To be fair, he has been conditioned to get *everything his heart desires* on Christmas for the past 36 years. He checked with his mom first and turns out it will be a birthday gift in 3 weeks. So I had to hear him whine about how he should have gotten that for Xmas and he was annoyed. Rolleyes But I give him that is the expectation he has been left with.

    I did my shopping online and certainly didn't mention to the kids, and I don't think they heard dh stomping his feet and whining like a baby. BUT they are being conditioned in the same manner by MIL, so not sure it matters. I was just mindful not to be obvious I was buying the stuff I didn't get. I felt it was very Un-Christmasy but I generally buy myself so little and got Christmas money from my folks to buy what we wanted, etc. The spirit of my purchases were very different than dh's whine fest, that is for sure.

  3. MonkeyMama Says:

    I think a lot of it is just the material sprirt of Christmas in general. I personally went shopping yesterday but it was not at all in the vein of "Why didn't they get me this?" It was more, "In-laws badgered my for a wish list and I got all this Christmas money - might as well buy some of the stuff I wanted and didn't get." Though without the very material celebration with the in-laws, I don't think I would have realized I wanted this stuff, nor thought to have gone shopping. I've been particularly noticing this year since I barely went into a store all year, and I realized the more I went into stores at year-end the more I tended to want to spend. IT was kind of obvious after a year of little urge to spend.

    OF course, growing up, Christmas was never about the gifts, for me.

    My dh on the other hand? I told him I was buying a couple of things, and asked if there was anything he didn't get? To be fair, he has been conditioned to get *everything his heart desires* on Christmas for the past 36 years. He checked with his mom first and turns out it will be a birthday gift in 3 weeks. So I had to hear him whine about how he should have gotten that for Xmas and he was annoyed. Rolleyes But I give him that is the expectation he has been left with.

    I did my shopping online and certainly didn't mention to the kids, and I don't think they heard dh stomping his feet and whining like a baby. BUT they are being conditioned in the same manner by MIL, so not sure it matters. I was just mindful not to be obvious I was buying the stuff I didn't get. I felt it was very Un-Christmasy but I generally buy myself so little and got Christmas money from my folks to buy what we wanted, etc. The spirit of my purchases were very different than dh's whine fest, that is for sure. That and it is really hard to escape the material focus of Christmas. I try, and I think we succeed on many levels, but then again here we are shopping for more. I wrestled back and forth with it a bit before I committed to my purchases.

  4. Amber Says:

    Your post nailed it for me, I actually hate Christmas. I feel as though people have forgotten the true meaning. I'm just glad it's ovwr

  5. Amber Says:

    Your post nailed it for me, I actually hate Christmas. I feel as though people have forgotten the true meaning. I'm just glad it's over

  6. Jerry Says:

    I love Christmas, and part of it is the fact that my kids are still small enough to make it magical. However, the general materialistic furor over it makes me a bit depressed, and I will seriously not hesitate to pull the plug on gifts completely if the kids get whiny or entitled. The most important p

  7. Jerry Says:

    (partial post?)
    ...most important parts of the season to me are the decorations, the religious aspect, the food (sweet MERCY, the food that it leads to!), and the feeling of goodwill that ought to permeate the season. Anything that offers insurance of increasing those elements, I'm all in. Anything that starts to move away from them? Forget it.
    Jerry

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